6 Result(s) found

Upstream Policies / waste prevention

Seven case studies of zero waste around the world.
Introduction: Stories From the Front Lines of the Zero Waste movement
Pune, India: Waste Pickers Lead the Way to Zero Waste
San Francisco, USA: Creating a Culture of Zero Waste
Alaminos, Philippines: Zero Waste, from Dream to Reality
Hernani, Spain: Door-to-Door Collection as a Strategy to Reduce Waste Disposal
La Pintana, Chile: Prioritizing the Recovery of Vegetable Waste
Mumbai, India: Waste Picker-run Biogas Plants as a Decentralized Solution


Region: Asia-Pacific
Year of publication : 2012
Document Type: Report&Data

The European Parliament is currently discussing its report on the Commission’s “Roadmap to a Resource Efficient Europe”. In Friends of the Earth’s and the EEB’s view, the Parliament needs to provide leadership on the following issues:  Indicators: Europe must measure its consumption of key natural resources, using effective and workable indicators: land footprint, water footprint, carbon footprint and material use footprint.  Targets: A commitment for Europe to develop targets to reduce its resource consumption, in particular to reduce our global land footprint.


Region: Europe
Year of publication : 2012
Document Type: Factsheet

The first section explains the legal obligations for waste prevention and the opportunities for waste prevention. The second section talks about the methodology, the different levels of action, the instruments of waste prevention, monitoring of a waste prevention programme, prevention indicators, who and how to monitor the indicators, and example of actions by waste streams.


Region: Europe
Year of publication : 2012
Document Type: Report&Data

GAIA's note on extended producer responsibility. To get to the root cause of waste, communities need to stop picking up after the producers of products that become waste and begin demanding that they do so themselves. The embodiment of this idea is Extended Producer Responsibility, which requires companies that manufacture or sell products to be responsible for such products after their useful life.


Document Type: Factsheet

GAIA's note on clean production. Clean Production is a way of designing products and manufacturing processes in harmony with natural ecological cycles. It takes a life cycle view of all materials flows, from extraction of the raw material to product manufacture and the ultimate fate of the product at the end of its life.


Document Type: Factsheet

GAIA's note on consumption. Our current consumption habits are fueling a global waste crisis. We simply cannot run a one-way, linear system of extraction->production->distribution->consumption->disposal indefinitely on a finite planet. The solution lies in decreasing the amount we consume, and making sure that products are designed to be less toxic, longer-lasting, and easy to recycle.


Document Type: Factsheet