7 Result(s) found

International laws & policies

The cement industry is a major contributor to climate change. The production of cement, the second most consumed product in the world after water, is one of the most energyintensive industrial processes. Although the cement companies are committed to reducing their emissions under the Kyoto Protocol, its strategies to achieve this are causing serious environmental, social and economic problems.


Document Type: Report&Data

Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) funding for incineration and landfills currently represents a lost opportunity to reduce pollution and help improve the welfare and standards of living of some of the poorest people in the world. Additionally, this funding incentivizes the destruction of valuable resources that would otherwise have been recovered with significant climate benefits. The following are a few examples of waste projects that have been approved or are being considered for CDM approval, and where there is growing community and waste worker opposition to the project.


Region: Asia-Pacific
Year of publication : 2009
Document Type: Press

Waste remains a growing problem in Europe, with only a few countries managing to stabilise or reduce the amount of municipal waste produced, or to achieve high recycling and composting rates. During the last few decades the EU has adopted a number of policies aimed at reducing waste generation and increasing recycling and composting, including the Waste Framework Directive (the revision of which is currently being finalised) and the Landfill Directive, aimed at reducing the amount of untreated organic waste going to landfill.


Region: Europe
Year of publication : 2008
Document Type: Report&Data

This report has been prepared for Friends of the Earth England, Wales and Northern Ireland’s work on international climate justice. The report is for decision makers, media and campaigners thinking through robust, workable and fair solutions to climate change ahead of the UN talks in Copenhagen in December 2009.There is a growing and credible body of evidence and opinion that offsetting is not working; that it is undermining efforts to prevent dangerous climate change and supporting sustainable development; that it is profoundly unjust, and that it cannot successfully be reformed.


Year of publication : 2009
Document Type: Report&Data

The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is supposed to catalyze climate-friendly projects in low-income countries by allowing developers to generate revenue by selling “carbon credits” or “offsets.” The offset buyers — industrialized country companies and governments — use the credits to show compliance with Kyoto Protocol-mandated emissions reductions. Because of the CDM’s structural flaws and cheating by project developers, billions of dollars worth of credits are being sold by projects that never needed assistance from the CDM to be built.


Year of publication : 2008
Document Type: Factsheet

Chapter 1 » introduces carbon trading, how it works and some of the actors involved. Chapter 2 » explores the origins and key actors involved in building the architecture of emissions trading. Chapter 3 » examines the performance of the EU ETS and finds that it has generously rewarded polluting companies while failing to reduce emissions. Many of the scheme’s flaws, from the overallocation of permits to pollute onwards, are found to be fundamental to the cap and trade approach more generally.


Year of publication : 2009
Document Type: Report&Data

UK-based power companies are using the myth that biomass is 'carbon neutral' to continue their emissions and greenwash their polluting activities permitted under the EU Emissions Trading System and other EU legislation. This deceptive accounting undermines analysis that places emissions from biomass on a par with fossil fuels. This British biomass boom is set to benefit polluters and cause widespread environmental destruction through land grabs and deforestation.


Region: Europe
Year of publication : 2012
Document Type: Report&Data