23 Result(s) found

Climate Impacts

Waste management practices are an important, although oft-neglected, contributor to climate change. Waste disposal drives climate change directly through the release of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from incinerators and methane (CH4) from landfills. Waste disposal also drives climate change indirectly by depriving the economy of reused, recycled and composted materials, thus requiring increased extraction of raw materials, an extremely energy-intensive process.


Year of publication : 2008
Document Type: Report&Data

This booklet is: A starting point. We hope these ideas will be quickly deepened or replaced by our peers as we expand and extend this conversation; An articulation of a political framework (Climate Justice) to understand some of the challenges we face and respond to them. It isn’t static. It isn’t the only useful framework in addressing climate change, either.


Document Type: Practical resources

We can take steps, large and small, to stop the climate crisis. What we cannot afford to do is go down the wrong road. Hoodwinked in the Hothouse is an easy and essential guide to navigating the landscape of false solutions—the cul-desacs on the route to a just and livable climate future. Includes Waste-to-Energy, Landfill-gas-retrieval, and biomass.


Document Type: Report&Data

Despite progress in recent years countries across the European Union (EU), including the United Kingdom (UK), are continuing to dispose of significant amounts of valuable recyclable materials to landfill or incineration. This analysis examines this disposal in more depth, in an attempt to provide a reasonable estimate of the amount of different recyclable materials that is lost through landfilling or incineration. The study then estimates the value of these lost materials, and the climate change benefits that could have been gained by recycling these materials.


Region: Europe
Year of publication : 2009
Document Type: Report&Data

This report has been prepared for Friends of the Earth England, Wales and Northern Ireland’s work on international climate justice. The report is for decision makers, media and campaigners thinking through robust, workable and fair solutions to climate change ahead of the UN talks in Copenhagen in December 2009.There is a growing and credible body of evidence and opinion that offsetting is not working; that it is undermining efforts to prevent dangerous climate change and supporting sustainable development; that it is profoundly unjust, and that it cannot successfully be reformed.


Year of publication : 2009
Document Type: Report&Data

Rising levels of gases in the Earth’s atmosphere are affecting the stability of the climate. Warming of the climate system is now unequivocal, evidenced by increases in global average air and ocean temperatures, widespread melting of snow and ice, and rising global average sea levels. Most of the observed increase in global average temperatures since the mid-20th century is very likely due to the increase in anthropogenic (human-induced) concentrations of six greenhouse gases (GHGs). Emissions of some GHGs can be traced directly to Municipal Solid Waste (MSW).


Region: Asia-Pacific
Year of publication : 2008
Document Type: Report&Data

The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is supposed to catalyze climate-friendly projects in low-income countries by allowing developers to generate revenue by selling “carbon credits” or “offsets.” The offset buyers — industrialized country companies and governments — use the credits to show compliance with Kyoto Protocol-mandated emissions reductions. Because of the CDM’s structural flaws and cheating by project developers, billions of dollars worth of credits are being sold by projects that never needed assistance from the CDM to be built.


Year of publication : 2008
Document Type: Factsheet

While major waste companies promote landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects that purport to capture methane released from landfills and convert it to electricity, a better solution lies in organics recycling.


Region: North America
Document Type: Report&Data

Chapter 1 » introduces carbon trading, how it works and some of the actors involved. Chapter 2 » explores the origins and key actors involved in building the architecture of emissions trading. Chapter 3 » examines the performance of the EU ETS and finds that it has generously rewarded polluting companies while failing to reduce emissions. Many of the scheme’s flaws, from the overallocation of permits to pollute onwards, are found to be fundamental to the cap and trade approach more generally.


Year of publication : 2009
Document Type: Report&Data

The Landfill Gas to Energy (LFGTE) Task Force was asked to evaluate whether LFGTE facilities decrease or increase net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We have unanimously concluded that reliance on landfill gas to generate electricity results in increased net GHG emissions. This is clearly the case when considering the fate of new wastes that could be diverted to waste management facilities more appropriate than landfills, and is almost certainly true for wastes already buried in landfills that collect landfill gas and flare it.


Region: North America
Year of publication : 2010
Document Type: Report&Data

"Landfill gas" is not the same as "natural gas" or "methane." They are three separate terms that mean different things. The term "landfill methane" is deceiving as it implies that landfill gas is simply methane. Landfill gas is about 45-55% methane, with the remainder being mostly carbon dioxide (CO2). It also contains hundreds of toxic contaminants known as Non-Methane Organic Compounds (NMOCs) as well as inorganic toxic contaminants like mercury and sometimes even radioactive contaminants like tritium.


Region: North America
Year of publication : 2008
Document Type: Factsheet

1. Establish and implement national, statewide, and municipal zero waste targets and plans. 2. Retire existing incinerators and halt construction of new incinerators and landfills. 3. Levy a per-ton surcharge on landfilled and incinerated materials. 4. Stop organic materials from being sent to landfills and incinerators. 5. End state and federal “renewable energy” subsidies to landfills and incinerators. 6. Provide policy incentives that create and sustain locally-based reuse, recycling, and composting jobs. 7. Expand adoption of per-volume or per-weight fees for the collection of trash.


Year of publication : 2008
Document Type: Factsheet

1. A zero waste approach is one of the fastest, cheapest, and most effective strategies we can use to protect the climate and the environment. Significantly decreasing waste disposed in landfills and incinerators will reduce greenhouse gases the equivalent to closing one-fifth of U.S. coal-fired power plants. This is comparable to leading climate protection proposals such as improving vehicle fuel efficiency. Indeed, implementing waste reduction and materials recovery strategies nationally are essential to put us on the path to stabilizing the climate by 2050.


Year of publication : 2008
Document Type: Report&Data

Waste policy has important climate change impacts, from, at one end, the emission savings by waste prevention or from recycling, to at the other end, the problem of methane emissions from landfill. Waste prevention is the most beneficial option from a climate point of view, followed by reuse and recycling; landfill and incineration are worse options. The UK Government is currently reviewing England’s waste policy, and is proposing to process 25% through energy from waste. But what is energy from waste?


Year of publication : 2006
Document Type: Report&Data

This report lays down some challenges to conventional wisdom and some dearly held beliefs. It is a piece of work which, from the author’s perspective, has been many years in its gestation, and which has a number of important implications.


Year of publication : 2006
Document Type: Report&Data

UK-based power companies are using the myth that biomass is 'carbon neutral' to continue their emissions and greenwash their polluting activities permitted under the EU Emissions Trading System and other EU legislation. This deceptive accounting undermines analysis that places emissions from biomass on a par with fossil fuels. This British biomass boom is set to benefit polluters and cause widespread environmental destruction through land grabs and deforestation.


Region: Europe
Year of publication : 2012
Document Type: Report&Data

A report for UKWIN in respect of an incinerator proposed for the Battlefield site at Shrewsbury in Shropshire. It considers the climate change impacts of landfilling or incinerating residual waste in the Shropshire region. Comparisons are made between 90,000 tonnes of waste sent to incinerator and landfill over a 20 year period. Since landfill emissions continue to occur for some time after this period, total impacts are also considered over a 150 year period.


Region: Europe
Year of publication : 2011
Document Type: Report&Data

American taxpayers and ratepayers are subsidizing a form of “renewable” energy—biomass electricity- that causes short and long-term harm to the public health and the environment. There are 234 of these so-called “clean and green” biomass electricity projects proposed for the U.S. The scale of these plants ranges from 25 to more than 100 megawatts (MW), often dwarfing the 255 existing biomass power facilities, which generally range from 2 to 5 MW capacity. This polluting form of electricity production currently accounts for over 50% of the so-called “renewable” energy in the U.S.


Region: North America
Year of publication : 2011
Document Type: Report&Data

UKWIN (United Kingdom Without Incineration Network)'s introductory note on greenhouse gas emissions from an incinerator. Original URL: http://ukwin.org.uk/resources/faq/how-much-co2-does-an-incinerator-emit/


Document Type: Factsheet

UKWIN (United Kingdom Without Incineration Network)'s introductory note on climate impacts of incinerators. Original URL: http://ukwin.org.uk/resources/climate-change/


Document Type: Factsheet

GAIA's note on waste and climate. Burning and landfilling waste drives climate change by releasing greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide from incinerators and methane from landfills. Waste disposal also drives climate change by depriving the economy of reused, recycled and composted materials, fueling a linear consumption system that requires the use of more energy and raw materials to create new goods.

Original URL: http://no-burn.org/section.php?id=85


Document Type: Factsheet

GAIA's policy statement "waste pickers and climate policy" Waste pickers are workers in the informal economy who recover recyclable materials from waste. They labor on the frontlines of the fight against climate change, earning livelihoods from recovery and recycling, reducing demand for natural resources, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Yet their successes are being undermined by “waste-to-energy” incinerators and landfills, and until 2009, they were notably absent from climate change discussions.


Document Type: Press