6 Result(s) found

Cement kilns

The cement industry is a major contributor to climate change. The production of cement, the second most consumed product in the world after water, is one of the most energyintensive industrial processes. Although the cement companies are committed to reducing their emissions under the Kyoto Protocol, its strategies to achieve this are causing serious environmental, social and economic problems.


Document Type: Report&Data

Groundwork's report on the impacts of cement kilns on the environment. Overview of toxic emissions from cement kilns etc.


Year of publication : 2007
Document Type: Report&Data

Groundwork's well-summarized report on energy and fuel in cement kilns. Shows how different fuels affet the emission levels of toxics from cement kilns, how mercury or dioxin is emitted. Because the process of turning limestone into clinker requires high temperatures, the cement industry is one of the most energy intensive industries, consuming about 10 times more energy than the average required by industry in general.


Document Type: Factsheet, Report&Data

GAIA's note on cement kilns. The incineration of waste burns up resources and results in emissions and residues that are harmful to people's health. Incinerating waste in cement kilns, which are not designed for this nor regulated for it, is a dangerous practice which should not be allowed under any circumstances.


Document Type: Factsheet

Groundwork's cement kiln portal top page. It outlines the general description of waste burning in cement kilns, and the manufacturing process of cement. All around the world communities are fighting cement kilns. With the current drive to reduce CO2 emissions, save on the cost of fuel and get rid of all kinds of waste, many cement companies are burning, or considering burning, what are politely called "alternative fuels" but should really be called waste.


Document Type: Factsheet

Groundwork's overview of alternative fuels and raw materials (AFR). Explains the points most often used as justifications of AFR, emissions of toxics from used tyres, and different kinds of alternative fuels. The term "Alternative Fuels" is generally a euphemism for waste. The waste that is most often considered as fuel for cement kilns includes used tyres, rubber, paper waste, waste oils, waste wood, paper sludge, sewage sludge, plastics and spent solvents and spent potliners.


Document Type: Factsheet