145 results found

Burning Public Money for Dirty Energy

This report outlines how “waste-to-energy” (WTE) incinerators – the costliest and most carbonintensive energy corporations – are poised to take advantage of taxpayer subsidies, unless fiscally responsible judgment prevails in federal and state policy arenas.

 

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Year of publication : 
2011

Questions to Ask When Evaluating a "Waste to Energy" Incinerator Project or Proposal

Communities facing the prospect of having “waste-to-energy” incinerators established in theirneighbourhoods have a right to know the full details of the project and its impact on their health and environment. Host communities carry the direct burdens of these technologies in terms of noise, environmental pollution, and health and social impacts.

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Year of publication : 
2016

From Bordo Poniente to CEMEX: the CDM’s support for waste incineration in cement factories

Mexico City generates more municipal solid waste (MSW) than any other municipality in Mexico: 15000 tons a day. 1Until recently, most of this wound up in the Bordo Poniente landfill, the biggest in all of Latin America.

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Year of publication : 
2013

Cement, waste and carbon markets

The cement industry is a major contributor to climate change. The production of cement, the second most consumed product in the world after water, is one of the most energyintensive industrial processes. Although the cement companies are committed to reducing their emissions under the Kyoto Protocol, its strategies to achieve this are causing serious environmental, social and economic problems.

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The informal recycling sector in developing countries: Organizing waste pickers to enhance their impact

For the urban poor in developing countries, informal waste recycling is a common way to earn income. There are few reliable estimates of the number of people engaged in waste picking or of its economic and environmental impact. Yet studies suggest that when organized and supported, waste picking can spur grassroots investment by poor people, create jobs, reduce poverty, save municipalities money, improve industrial competitiveness, conserve natural resources, and protect the environment.

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Year of publication : 
2008

Hoodwinked in the Hothouse. False solutions to climate change

We can take steps, large and small, to stop the climate crisis. What we cannot afford to do is go down the wrong road. Hoodwinked in the Hothouse is an easy and essential guide to navigating the landscape of false solutions—the cul-desacs on the route to a just and livable climate future. Includes Waste-to-Energy, Landfill-gas-retrieval, and biomass.

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Zero Waste for Zero Warming: GAIA’s Statement of Concern on Waste and Climate Change

Waste management practices are an important, although oft-neglected, contributor to climate change. Waste disposal drives climate change directly through the release of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from incinerators and methane (CH4) from landfills.

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Year of publication : 
2008

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